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Personality May Affect a New Mother’s Decision to Breastfeed

A new analysis has found that mothers who are more extroverted and less anxious are more likely to breastfeed and to continue to breastfeed than mothers who are introverted or anxious. Published early online in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, the study indicates that new mothers with certain personalities may need additional support and education to help them feel confident, self assured, and knowledgeable about breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding is important for the health of both mother and baby: breastfed babies have lower levels of infections and allergies and are less likely to be overweight, while mothers who breastfeed are less likely to develop certain cancers.

Many factors can affect whether a mother breastfeeds, but mothers who have lots of support, feel confident, and know how to overcome problems are more likely to breastfeed for longer. Understanding what makes a mother feel confident and supported is important to increasing breastfeeding rates. Many studies have looked at the role of mothers’ education, age, and relationships, but the link between breastfeeding and a mother’s personality has not been explored.

To investigate, Amy Brown, PhD, of Swansea University in the United Kingdom, surveyed 602 mothers with infants aged six to 12 months old. The questionnaire examined the mothers’ personalities, how long they breastfed, and their attitudes and experiences of breastfeeding. Data were collected between March and June 2009.

Mothers who indicated that they were extroverts and were emotionally stable were significantly more likely to initiate and continue breastfeeding for a longer duration. Mothers who were introverted or anxious were more likely to use formula milk or only breastfeed for a short while.

Dr. Brown believes that the findings can be explained by the link between mothers’ personalities and their attitudes and experiences of breastfeeding. Mothers who were introverted felt more self-conscious about breastfeeding in front of others and were more likely to formula feed because other people wanted them to. Meanwhile mothers who were anxious found breastfeeding was more difficult and felt that they couldn’t get the support they needed. These factors are known to be linked to low breastfeeding rates.

“The important message from the findings is that some mothers may face more challenges with breastfeeding based on their wider personality. Although they may want to breastfeed, more introverted or anxious mothers may need further support in boosting their confidence and learning about how to solve problems, and they may need encouragement to make sure they access the breastfeeding support services that are available,” said. Dr. Brown.


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Full citation: “Maternal trait personality and breastfeeding duration: the importance of confidence and social support.” Amy Brown. Journal of Advanced Nursing; Published Online: August 6, 2013 (DOI: 10.1111/jan.12219).
URL Upon publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jan.12219

About the Author: Amy Brown, PhD, is affiliated with Swansea University in the United Kingdom.
To arrange an interview with the Author, please contact Delyth Purchase of Swansea University’s Public Relations Office at d.purchase@swansea.ac.uk or +44 1792 513022.

About the Journal:
The Journal of Advanced Nursing (JAN) is a world-leading international peer reviewed Journal. It targets readers who are committed to advancing practice and professional development on the basis of new knowledge and evidence. JAN contributes to the advancement of evidence-based nursing, midwifery and healthcare by disseminating high quality research and scholarship of contemporary relevance and with potential to advance knowledge for practice, education, management or policy.
http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/JAN

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